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Deconsecration/Re-Buried (Split)

Publisher
Selfmadegod Records
FFO
Grave, Bolt Thrower, Funebrarum
Release Date
31/01/2021
Publisher
Selfmadegod Records
Genre
Death Metal

Two bands from Seattle. Both are steeped in Old School Death Metal. If you went back to DM’s earliest days, this would be the soundtrack for that journey. Deep and dark, riddled with the sound of the underworld’s filth, both bands take the listener on a horrid trek through the darkest realms.  

Deconsecration begins with “Priestess of the Void,” an outstanding track incorporating multiple tempos, manic guitar work, and ungodly vocals that swell up to the surface. Zach’s vocal delivery is a bit low in the mix, part voice, part instrument, all menacing, and effective. Another standout is “Shortness of Breath,” complete with a tongue-in-cheek PSA about death, showing DM has a (morbid) sense of humor. This, like Deconsecration’s other three tracks, showcase the band’s outstanding musicianship.

Re-Buried is a bit more frenzied. Insane tempos, frenetic drumming, and buzzsaw guitars that almost seem out of control all combine for a wildly satisfying experience. Multi-textured and multi-layered, Re-Buried’s approach is off the rails, its wall of sound has solid complexity. This is especially true on “Hypocrisy Incarnate.” Its constant barrage of tremolo guitar, odd counter melodies, and glottal accentuated vocals make this track worthy of multiple spins.  

Collectively, these bands wear you down, yet leave you clamouring for more. Two up and comers with talent and reverence for the Old School ways.  Two bands to watch…or perhaps to fear. You be the judge.

a reverence for the Old School ways
80

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